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Table 3 Knowledge about emergency contraception among female students, Mizan-Tepi University, south west Ethiopia, March, 2014 (n = 332)

From: Factors associated with utilization of emergency contraception among female students in Mizan-Tepi University, South West Ethiopia

Knowledge assessment items Number Percent
Where do you think emergency contraception could be obtained
 Pharmacy/Health facility 87 26.2
 Any shops 143 43.1
 I don’t know 102 30.7
Which one of these drugs can be used for emergency contraception   
 Combined oral contraceptive 98 29.5
 Progesterone only pills & IUCD 90 27.1
 Anti-biotic like ampicillin 34 10.2
 I don’t know 110 33.2
When taken early, emergency contraception prevent sexually transmitted infections   
 Yes 158 47.5
 No 51 15.4
 I don’t know 123 37.1
Situation(s) that emergency contraception should be taken   
 If condom ruptured during intercourse 109 32.8
 When there is a missed pill 78 23.4
 When forced to have sex/rape 140 42.1
 When there is failure of contraception 169 50.9
 I don’t know 145 43.6
The recommended maximum time limit to take emergency contraception pills   
 Within 24 h after sex 120 36.1
 Within 72 h after sex 94 28.3
 Within 5 days after sex 42 12.7
 I don’t know 76 22.9
Effectiveness of emergency contraception pills in preventing pregnancy   
 Highly effective (>95 %) 52 15.7
 Effective (75–89 %) 68 20.5
  Less effective (<10 %) 29 8.7
  Not effective at all 40 12.0
  I don’t know 143 43.1
Recommended number of dose of emergency contraception pills   
 One dose 50 15.1
 Two doses 54 16.3
 Three doses 35 10.5
 I don’t know 193 58.1
Recommended time between the doses of emergency contraception pills   
 Twelve hours apart 49 14.8
 Twenty-four hours apart 45 13.5
 Seventy-two hours apart 50 15.1
 I don’t know 188 56.6
Knowledge of EC (Summary index)   
 Good knowledge 80 24.1
 Poor knowledge 252 75.9