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Table 3 Questions related to the professional and personal qualities of an interpreter in the survey of Arabic-speaking individuals’ attitudes to the use of interpreters in healthcare

From: Arabic-speaking migrants’ attitudes, opinions, preferences and past experiences concerning the use of interpreters in healthcare: a postal cross-sectional survey

Variable N Agree N (%) Disagree N (%) Mean ± Sd.
It is of no importance whether an interpreter is fluent in both languages 52 51 (96%) 1 (2%) 3.9 ± 0.4
It is important that an interpreter has a great ability to translate 52 51(96%) 1 (2%) 3.9 ± 0.3
An interpreter should show me respect 53 51 (96%) 2 (4%) 3.8 ± 0.5
It is important that an interpreter have training both in the language and the terminology used in healthcare 52 50 (94%) 2 (3%) 3.9 ± 0.5
It is important that the interpreter is neutral and impartial 51 48 (91%) 3 (9%) 3.7 ± 0.6
The interpreter’s age is of no importance for the translation 52 41 (77%) 11 (21%) 3.1 ± 1.0
It is important that an interpreter talks the same dialect as me 53 40 (75%) 13 (25%) 3.3 ± 1.0
It is not important what clothes an interpreter wears and whether he/she is provocatively dressed 52 36 (68%) 16 (30%) 3.0 ± 1.3
It is not important what religion the interpreter belongs to 53 35 (66%) 18 (34%) 2.7 ± 1.2
It is important that I know what country the interpreter comes from 53 34 (64%) 19 (36%) 2.9 ± 1.2
I think that it is important to use an interpreter of the same gender as myself 51 31 (58%) 20 (38%) 2.8 ± 1.2
It is not important that the interpreter introduces him/herself to me before starting the interpretation session 53 16 (30%) 37 (70%) 2.0 ± 1.2
It is not important that an interpreter is trained 52 14 (26%) 38 (72%) 1.9 ± 1.1
It is of no importance to me whether the interpreter tells other people about what I have told the physician or nurse during my consultation in which he/she has interpreted 53 8 (15%) 45 (85%) 1.4 ± 0.9