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Table 4 Questions related to modes of interpretation and the types of interpreter in the survey of Arabic-speaking individuals’ attitudes to the use of interpreters in healthcare

From: Arabic-speaking migrants’ attitudes, opinions, preferences and past experiences concerning the use of interpreters in healthcare: a postal cross-sectional survey

Variable N Agree N (%) Disagree N (%) Mean ± Sd.
It is good to use an interpreter who has special training and who is employed by an agency 53 52 (98%) 1 (2%) 3.8 ± 0.5
I prefer to use a telephone interpreter during sensitive investigations 52 49 (92%) 3 (8%) 3.7 ± 0.7
I prefer to use an interpreter in place 52 46 (87%) 6 (13%) 3.3 ± 0.8
Bilingual healthcare staff are good to use as interpreters because they are already in place when interpreting is to be done 49 46 (87%) 3 (13%) 3.5 ± 0.7
There is no difference between using telephone interpreters and interpreters in place 52 34(64%) 18 (36%) 2.6 ± 1.1
Using a family member/friend as interpreter implies that I get support from family/friend at the same time as he/she translates 52 33 (62%) 19 (38%) 2.7 ± 1.1
I feel confidence in using a family member/friend as an interpreter more than an unknown person being an interpreter 52 28 (53%) 24 (47%) 2.5 ± 1.2
I prefer to use a family member/friend as an interpreter 53 25 (47%) 28 (53%) 2.4 ± 1.1
There is no risk that all information will not be translated when I use a family member/friend as interpreter 51 17 (32%) 34 (68%) 2.0 ± 1.1