Skip to main content

Advertisement

Figure 1 | BMC Research Notes

Figure 1

From: Risky monetary behavior in chronic back pain is associated with altered modular connectivity of the nucleus accumbens

Figure 1

Monetary decision making is more impulsive in CBP relative to CON, seen in behavior but not in task brain activity. a) A depiction of the task is given. When the stimulus offer was shown, participants decided whether the possibility of winning the amount in green was worth possibly losing the amount in red. Each trial lasted 12.5 seconds, with an inter-trial interval of 10 to 12.5 seconds. b) Loss-aversion matrices are shown for 2 subjects. Notice the CBP patient was more likely to accept a monetary offer than the CON subject, with complete acceptance at the highest potential gain. c) Gain and loss sensitivity curves are shown for the same 2 subjects. Each point represents the probability of accepting an offer withr each potential gain or loss. The number “m” is the slope of the fitted line, indicating their gain or loss sensitivity. d) Mean loss aversion matrices for each group are shown. The right-most matrix is the difference between the group means, highlighting the higher probability of acceptance for higher gains in CBP. The color bar expresses a different range of probabilities, where negative values indicate a higher probability of acceptance in CON, and positive values indicate higher probability for CBP. e) The bar plots show each group’s mean gain and loss sensitivity scores. The error bar represents the standard error. Only gain sensitivity is significantly different (p < 0.05), with CBPs exhibiting a higher likelihood of accepting monetary offers when larger potential gains are involved. f) Regions with significant activation for task versus baseline for CON and CBP are shown, with Z-statistic thresholded at 2.3 (shown here >3.0) and results whole-brain cluster corrected at p < 0.05. The statistical contrast map between activations for CONs and CBPs was empty, even before correction for multiple comparisons.

Back to article page